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Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

3 edition of Life history of Dall porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli, True 1885) found in the catalog.

Life history of Dall porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli, True 1885)

Life history of Dall porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli, True 1885)

incidentally taken by the Japanese high seas salmon mothership fishery in the northwestern North Pacific and western Bering Sea, 1978 to 1980

  • 294 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Porpoises.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Terrell Charles Newby.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationvi, 155 leaves
    Number of Pages155
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14243033M

    Taxonomy. In earlier literature, 2 species have been described: Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli) and True's porpoise (Phocoenoides truei), based on color variations and differences in the number of r, it is now generally accepted that there is only one species, with two different forms, referred to as dalli-type and truei-type (Minasian et al (), Klinowska ()). Dall's Porpoise Range Species Fact: Dall's porpoises are considered the fastest swimmers among small cetaceans, capable of reaching speeds up to 34 mph (55 km/h).

    is the official website of the Porpoise Conservation Society — a non-profit society registered in British Columbia, Canada (S). Charity Registration Number RR Abstract. Dall’s porpoise, Phocoenoides dalli (True), is commonly encountered over the continental shelf of North America and in offshore and pelagic waters of the western and eastern North Pacific Ocean. This striking black and white porpoise is characterized by great speed and a cone-shaped splash it makes when surfacing to by:

    The diet of Dall’s porpoise is quite diverse but it will take what ever is available within its range and depending on the season. It usually eats pounds ( kg) of food a day. Generally, as well as squid, it preys on schools of small fish such as sardines and herring, though it also hunts deep water fish such as hake and smelt. The book provides a case study of what can go wrong when the needs of industry and conservation collide. The life history of Dall's porpoise .


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Life history of Dall porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli, True 1885) Download PDF EPUB FB2

Taxonomy. Dall’s porpoise is the only member of the genus dalli- and truei-types were initially described as separate species inbut later studies determined that the available evidence only supported the existence of one species.

Currently, these two color morphs are recognized as distinct subspecies, Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli dalli) and Class: Mammalia.

Porpoises, along with whales and dolphins, are descendants of land-living ungulates (hoofed animals) that first entered the oceans around 50 million years ago (Mya). During the Miocene (23 to 5 Mya), mammals were fairly modern, meaning they seldom changed physiologically from the time.

The cetaceans diversified, and fossil evidence suggests porpoises and dolphins diverged Class: Mammalia. The baby porpoise is about three feet long at birth. Calves and their mothers live separate from main porpoise herds for a period of time.

Lactation lasts two to four months and Dall's porpoise usually have calves every three years. The average life span is 16–17 years. Feeding Ecology Dall's porpoises eat a wide variety of prey.

“[This book] contains many good illustrations of the majority of extant species of whales, dolphins, and porpoises (cetaceans). It also provides a general overview of the systematics and evolution of cetaceans as a group and very brief summaries of anatomy, feeding, life history, range, and conservation issues for each species.

Dall’s porpoise are found only in the North Pacific Ocean and adjacent seas (Bering Sea, Okhotsk Sea and Sea of Japan). They range from coastal waters to deep offshore waters (see map below). Details of migrations are poorly known, however, Dall’s porpoise are year-round resident though-out much of their range, generally moving north for.

We describe the life history of harbor porpoises in the Gulf of Maine by examining animals killed in gill net fisheries and comparing these findings with the results of previous studies from the Bay of Fundy.

Most female porpoises matured at age. Dall's porpoises swim so quickly that they produce a "rooster tail" as they move.

They can grow up to about 8 feet in length and pounds in weight. They can swim at speeds over 30 miles per hour, making them one of the fastest cetacean species, and the fastest porpoise. Life History Growth and Reproduction The harbor porpoise reaches sexual maturity at three to four years of age and the females can give birth every two years.

After a gestation period of approximately 11 months, females give birth to calves that weigh 14–22 lbs. (–10kg). The calves are nursed for eight to 12 months.

Other articles where Dall porpoise is discussed: porpoise: The Dall porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli) is the largest porpoise and the only member of its genus. Active and gregarious, it often rides the bow waves of ships. The Dall porpoise is black with a.

Porpoise, any of seven species of toothed whales distinguishable from dolphins by their more compact build, generally smaller size (maximum length about 2 meters, or feet), and curved blunt snout with spatulate rather than conical teeth.

In North America the name is sometimes applied to dolphins. Discover Life's page about the biology, natural history, ecology, identification and distribution of Phocoenoides dalli - Dalls Porpoise -- Discover Life.

Phocoenoides dalli Common name Dall's porpoise Synonyms Phocaena dalli Lifespan, ageing, and relevant traits Maximum longevity 22 years (wild) Source ref. 1 Sample size Medium Data quality Acceptable Observations.

Average longevity is around years. Maximum longevity is probably underestimated. Life history traits (averages) Female sexual. What is a porpoise. What kinds of porpoises are there. Where do porpoises live.

The history of porpoises and humans Harbor porpoise Vacquita Dall’s porpoise Burmeister’s porpoise Spectacled porpoise Finless porpoise Conclusion Author Bio Publisher.

Introduction. The porpoise, a relation of the dolphin, is a beautiful creature. These are some Dall Porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli) racing with our boat. They are pretty common in Alaskan waters but still always AWSOME to see. LIFE IN THE FAST LANE: THE LIFE HISTORY OF HARBOR PORPOISES FROM THE GULF OF MAINE.

Authors. Andrew J. Read, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MassachusettsU.S.A. Search for more papers by this author. Duke University Marine Laboratory, Beaufort, North CarolinaU.S.A. [This book] contains many good illustrations of the majority of extant species of whales, dolphins, and porpoises (cetaceans).

It also provides a general overview of the systematics and evolution of cetaceans as a group and very brief summaries of anatomy, feeding, life history, range, and conservation issues for each : University of Chicago Press.

Book Description. This book summarizes and analyzes the biology, ecology, exploitation and management of small cetaceans in Japan. It describes the various types of cetacean fisheries in Japan and their historical development, the life histories and ecologies of the main species involved, and the history and problems of conservation and management.

Harbor Porpoise. Harbor porpoises are shy, elusive sea mammals whose numbers are declining primarily because they are frequently caught by accident in. Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli) Appearance. Porpoises look much like dolphins, but they are different in some ways: They are smaller and more stout.

They have spade-shaped teeth, rounded heads, blunt jaws, and triangular dorsal fins. Images. Dall's porpoise A drawing of a Harbour porpoise. Class: Mammalia. Female Dall's porpoises reproduce at approximately six years of age while male Dall's porpoises mature at 8 years of age.

Dall's porpoise calves are born in mid-summer after a 12 month gestation period. They are about 3 feet ( meters) long.

Calves and their mothers live separate from main porpoise herds for a time. Dall's porpoise mothers. Typical of the porpoise family, Dall's porpoise has a stocky body, and it has a short, wide-based, triangular dorsal fin ().The dorsal fin is slightly falcate at the tip, but the entire fin may be canted forward in adult males (Jefferson, ).The tail stock is deepened, especially in adult males, and males also have a prominent post-anal hump of connective by: 8.

Jakob von Uexküll, the 20th-century Estonian-German biologist and philosopher, introduced the concept of an animal's Umwelt: the world around the animal as experienced through its sense organs. One of the classic examples is von Uexküll's description of a tick's Umwelt, described in his book A Foray Into the Worlds of Animals and use Author: Magnus Wahlberg, Meike Linnenschmidt, Peter Teglberg Madsen, Danuta Wisniewska, Lee A.

Miller. Only killer whales and bottlenose dolphins had intraspecific variability in this variable. The second life-history variable is the mean asymptotic body length of females. Only one estimate was available for this variable in Dall's porpoise and could thus not be included in the evaluation for that species.

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